Should Your Company Dump The Facebook Page?

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Facebook, the social networking platform that people love to hate, or is the other way around? If you’re a marketing rep or business owner it is likely both. Recall the good old days: run contests, get lots of fans, post stuff on your page and watch everyone see and go crazy over all your sales and promotions.

Everyone was happy, but then Facebook had to go all corporate and try to turn a profit. How dare they! Imagine running a business and trying to make money. That’s okay for us, but not for them, right? We had it good for a while, but it’s time to face reality. You have to pay to play on Facebook.

I’ve counseled a number of local business on the need to create online space that you own instead of rent. Although I won’t name names, you know who you are. Restaurants and retail shops without websites have run for years with Facebook as their only online presence. And up until recently that was pretty much all they felt they had to do. Reality bites, and in this case it’s a wakeup call.

Facebook.com is owned by Facebook, not you or your company. Yourcompany.com is/can be owned by you. There you have total control. Your social media profile is rented space. And as Scott Stratten says in the video below…it’s time to start paying rent.

Before you jump up and scream “just say no to Facebook” and run off to cancel your page think very carefully. Companies need to be where their customers are. If your website has little or no traffic, then you may want to consider sticking around Facebook a while longer until you can figure out how to woo them over to your site. With over a billion users, some of your customers may be there.

 

Be warned. This video contains coarse language.

Jon is a Digital Marketing Strategist and Creative Media Specialist who has helped companies of all shapes and sizes with their marketing efforts. A board member of the Chattanooga Technology Council, he's actively involved in covering the emerging business tech scene. Find him on Twitter @jonfmoss